Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature #2020

Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature By Tison Pugh Innocence Heterosexuality and the Queerness of Children s Literature Innocence Heterosexuality and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • Title: Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature
  • Author: Tison Pugh
  • ISBN: 9780415886338
  • Page: 122
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature By Tison Pugh Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensiInnocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensions between innocence and heterosexuality within their pages Pugh argues that children cannot retain their innocence of sexuality while learning about normative heterosexuality, yet this inherent paradox runs throughout many classic narratives of literature for young readers Children s literature typically endorses heterosexuality through its invisible presence as the de facto sexual identity of countless protagonists and their families, yet heterosexuality s ubiquity is counterbalanced by its occlusion when authors shield their readers from forthright considerations of one of humanity s most basic and primal instincts.The book demonstrates that tensions between innocence and sexuality render much of children s literature queer, especially when these texts disavow sexuality through celebrations of innocence In this original study, Pugh develops interpretations of sexuality that few critics have yet ventured, paving the way for future scholarly engagement with larger questions about the ideological role of children s literature and representations of children s sexuality.Tison Pugh is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Central Florida He is the author of Queering Medieval Genres and Sexuality and Its Queer Discontents in Middle English Literature and has published on children s literature in such journals as Children s Literature, The Lion and the Unicorn, and Marvels and Tales.
    Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature By Tison Pugh Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness Dec , Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensions between innocence and heterosexuality Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children Dec , Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensions between innocence and heterosexuality Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness Dec , Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensions between innocence and heterosexuality Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children Jul , Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter Introduction Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Children cannot retain their innocence of sexuality while learning about normative heterosexuality, yet this inherent paradox runs throughout many classic narratives of children s literature A recalcitrant ideological confl ict thereby emerges within the genre, in which innocence and heterosexuality clash and conjointly subvert its foundations. Innocence, heterosexuality, and the queerness of children Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines some of the distinguished classics of children s literature, both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J.K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensions between innocence and Laura Thain on Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Ultimately, Pugh asserts that in the land of Oz, both innocence and heterosexuality are to be feared rather than embraced as Dorothy suggests, innocence is a foreign entity which invites vulnerability, and heterosexuality is ultimately tied to gendered labor rather than reproductive or erotic power. Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children s Literature examines distinguished classics of children s literature both old and new including L Frank Baum s Oz books, Laura Ingalls Wilder s Little House series, J K Rowling s Harry Potter novels, Lemony Snicket s A Series of Unfortunate Events, and Stephenie Meyer s Twilight series to explore the queer tensions between innocence and heterosexuality
    • UNLIMITED AUDIOBOOK ✓ Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature - by Tison Pugh
      122 Tison Pugh
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      Published :2020-06-09T19:54:53+00:00

    About "Tison Pugh"

    1. Tison Pugh

      Tison Pugh is Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Central Florida He is the author of Queering Medieval Genres and Sexuality and Its Queer Discontents in Middle English Literature and has published on children s literature in such journals as Children s Literature, The Lion and the Unicorn, and Marvels and Tales.

    284 thoughts on “Innocence, Heterosexuality, and the Queerness of Children's Literature”

    1. NOTE This rating review does not cover the last two essays in this monograph I didn t read those because 1 I ve not read any of the books they analyze, and 2 I m not all that interested in reading the books they analyze.I knew when I read the title that I was going to love this book I like children s literature, and I like when people point out that it s just as ideologically driven and politically engaged as adult literature Pugh s overall thesis is that there is a tension in a lot of children [...]


    2. Genius level analysis If you re a children or adolescent lit scholar, you need to get your hands on this book The introduction alone rocked my world Of course, as with almost all Routledge titles, it s W A Y too expensive to buy on your own, so you might think about asking your library to order it and then others can get their hands on it, too HIGHLY recommended.


    3. I had to read the Harry Potter chapter out of this for class, and it was so ridiculous It doesn t come across as an analysis, but a manipulation of the text to suit the author s needs I will not be reading this book in full unless forced or paid a significant amount of money.


    4. While some of the chapters were difficult, dull, or felt a bit far fetched, there were two or three that were so perfectly constructed that they were both eye opening and wonderful to read.


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